Yep, It’s Going Slower Than Molasses..

.. flowing uphill in February.

No, I’ve not hived off due to generous bribes and cases of The GlenLivet to fight on behalf of the jihad, or Iggy, or Obama, mmkay?

For reasons I’m not free to divulge, that’s how fast blogging is going right now in 2010. I’m actually working away it until I’m all but cross-eyed, but the current post is already days in the making, and I’m still at least a day or three away from any blankety-blanking end product.

Apologies, and thanks for your patience,

Binks

Advertisements

5 thoughts on “Yep, It’s Going Slower Than Molasses..

  1. You should put up a volunteer help wanted add. I would certainly respond and I’m sure others would too.

    Have a news gathering contest, winner gets to work for Binks…..

  2. .
    .
    A diversion in the cold and dark. Just the worst time of the year to make such a journey.

    In another century, I wrote a little piece about time, the elusive quantity that seems to speed up when we need it most. Binks needs more time, but where can he get some? I think he’s a religious sort of person so maybe I could suggest some “thought experiments”, which at least might put him to sleep if he needs some of that, too.

    One of the baffling things about time is that it is supposed to begin in the remote past and to continue up to the present and beyond into the future. Even when we read that chapter in Stephen Hawking’s book, “A Brief History of Time”, concerning the arrow of time, we find such an idea. The title is no help because, even there, there is the implication that time begins in the past; evidently, we are conditioned to accept that as obvious — like many other things, these days.

    But wait a minute. We can think of yesterday, today, and tomorrow. Easy enough, but where does today come from? It certainly doesn’t come from the past! Time, as we experience it, seems to originate in the future, to flow by us today, and then it is stored in the past; time’s arrow appears to go in a direction opposite to what people and books usually assume. It’s odd, but don’t we confuse what time is associated with and what time is, in itself? We progress from past to future and get older like everybody. But doesn’t it make more sense to think that time itself (whatever it is) goes the other way? Clocks and actual time are not the same thing.

    However, if time were created at the `beginning’ before there was anything then how could it come from the future or the past? It couldn’t. Possibly, time is not created like other things but is something continually coming from somewhere, not from the past, not from the future, but from the present where there is no duration. Maybe, just maybe, it makes more sense to think that time comes out of the present! Even now, on occasion, we sometimes recall or experience precious moments, fleeting glimpses into a dimension where there appears to be no time, or at least where the future and the past appear to mingle.

    Christians (and their Jewish parents) believe that it is God who first loved us and that He is beyond our time as we know it; yet, He is here, now. He is everlasting and able to answer our prayers and He patiently waits for us to realize the fact. Particularly in the OT there is story after story of the One God who acts, and the people, typically His people, who respond. Time after time, the act mixed with the response yields the inevitable, ineluctable consequences. The idea is that this interaction, this communication of the Created with the created is the origin of time.

    In the physical world it is the notions of emission and reception, action and reaction, that allow us to formulate equations which include time. Basically, if we think that receiving and giving can best be understood in terms of expectation and memory then it is the elusive time that allows one to be the other. The visible and the invisible, past and future, like divine romance, embrace in time; a pledge, our creed, is His love. Grace, like time, in time, encompasses and sustains all, and it issues from the moment, every moment. As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, unto ages of ages is His glory; amen… is our faith, His righteousness, our fulfilment, His promise, our communion, His delight, our joy and vision. We reach out from this moment convinced or in desparation; He is waiting, yes, but He is also seeking… now. Time, at the moment, like mediation, allows past and future to transform and be reconciled.

    So there. There is the source of time; it’s totally free, and limitless. It means there is a time to blog, and a time to flog. A time to write and a time to fight.

    I like to make reference to the prophet, Steynaniah, aka Mark Steyn. What makes him write (and right!) so much, is that he hopes he’s wrong. Deconstructing consequences is like an eye-opener, a vision, when choices, events, and truth communicate. Five, four, three, two, one…now: that precious, timeless moment, the time of salvation.

    Time gives life to freedom and everything that involves creativity. We learn from the past and hope for the future in order to build or fashion the present; mind to heart like harmony of law becomes melody of grace. At that lingering and local moment when past and future dance something totally new is born.
    .
    .

  3. I like to make reference to the prophet, Steynaniah, aka Mark Steyn. What makes him write (and right!) so much, is that he hopes he’s wrong. Deconstructing consequences is like an eye-opener, a vision, when choices, events, and truth communicate. Five, four, three, two, one…now: that precious, timeless moment, the time of salvation

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s