Binks Loves Liberries

img500

~ ITEM: Neil Postman quotes on Amusing Ourselves To Death

~ ITEM: List of destroyed ancient libraries; and 11 Most Impressive Libraries from the Ancient World

~~~

~ WILL IT BE SO? I don’t know, but I dearly hope so.

God knows all things. Unlike all the lost libraries of ancient history, destroyed by fire, mindlessness, warfare, the decline of the surrounding societies, I hope the endless libraries and museums of heaven reveal all things.

I have a special sorrow and anger towards book-burners and library-torchers. To those who would erase truth and goodness and the efforts to know and grow in truth, beauty, and goodness represented in literature. Nazis, Islamic armies, the Golden Horde, whoever– may God give me grace to want to forgive such truly and deeply evil people and their actions.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Heaven’s High Halls

Imagine walking the glowing stacks of living golden books, extending high and wide and far.

What could you read about? What books pass on to friends and others to enjoy? The events of the Bible as they happened? The places, faces, and people of the Old & New Testament? The wonders & beauties of the universe? Atlantis? Prehistoric civilizations? Aliens? The pyramids in their original glory? The lost books of Aristotle, Sophocles? All the amazing creatures that ever lived on every world? History as it was? All the songs about the martyrs, known and unknown?

IMG_6514

There is so much that is lost by the death of living witnesses, societies, libraries, art, and architecture. There is more danger in the loss of interest in books, in the learning, pondering, marking, inwardly digesting which has helped build & preserve society since forever.

Stupiding Ourselves To Death

Technology, twinkling lights, factoid rich ignorance in which literature is shrugged off is more of a threat to all of us that the attempts by our elites to dumb us down and hide the truth of the past & present. Neil Postman comments & warns:

What Orwell feared were those who would ban books. What Huxley feared was that there would be no reason to ban a book, for there would be no one who wanted to read one. Orwell feared those who would deprive us of information. Huxley feared those who would give us so much that we would be reduced to passivity and egoism. Orwell feared that the truth would be concealed from us. Huxley feared the truth would be drowned in a sea of irrelevance. Orwell feared we would become a captive culture. Huxley feared we would become a trivial culture, preoccupied with some equivalent of the feelies, the orgy porgy, and the centrifugal bumblepuppy. As Huxley remarked in Brave New World Revisited, the civil libertarians and rationalists who are ever on the alert to oppose tyranny “failed to take into account man’s almost infinite appetite for distractions.” In 1984, Orwell added, people are controlled by inflicting pain. In Brave New World, they are controlled by inflicting pleasure. In short, Orwell feared that what we fear will ruin us. Huxley feared that what we desire will ruin us.

Civilizations decline & die for many and various reasons: that our western success in technology, irrelevant pop culture, and stupiding ‘educational systems’ might in fact iceberg our own Titanic would be a very sad tale for future societies to reflect upon. We have been warned.

Finally, In Conclusions

I hope that the completeness and culmination of all things which will be the eternal progress into God which is heaven includes a remembrance of all things in their truth. The Libraries Of Heaven.

If not that, then something so much better. ~

shutterstock_90621538

Advertisements

One thought on “Binks Loves Liberries

  1. Hi Binks:

    Thank you for this tremendous post. I found it to be a deliciously nutritional philosophical breakfast.

    I’m reminded of an episode of Twilight Zone that made a impact both poignant and powerful upon my fertile youthful mind. As I recall, it was Rod Serling’s tale of a bespectacled meek and mild mannered bibliophile of a banker who would take his lunch break in the bank’s vault so as to avoid the distractions that prevented him from the maximum enjoyment of his reading.

    One day, during his lunch break, his world is rocked by something akin to a nuclear explosion. He emerges from the protection of the bank vault to realize he is apparently the sole survivor in his city. As he stumbles and rummages around, he discovers what had been the public library. His heart soars as he picks up volume after volume, dusting them off and stacking them up – enough reading to last him for years!

    He is just about to sit back and crack open his first volume when he notices something just out of his reach on the stone steps of what had been the library. As he reaches forward to grab at that object, his eye-glasses fall from his face and the lenses shatter on the stone. Serling then blurs the camera lens to portray the fact that this gentleman has lost his ability to see well enough to read. And so the story ends.

    I’m not sure this TZ episode would have the same resonance with today’s generation of youth.

    In sincere appreciation of what God has raised up in the Binkmeister . . .

    Pete B.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s